Friday, October 21, 2011

Rep. Hahn (R) proposes repeal of riparian buffer

Rep. Marcia Hahn (R) from Nazareth has issued a letter of intent to introduce legislation repealing the 150' riparian buffer zone from PA streams.  Please see the attached letter.

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Trout Unlimited Calls on Gov. Corbett to Tighten Marcellus Shale Environmental Standards

Trout Unlimited Calls on Gov. Corbett to Tighten Marcellus Shale Environmental Standards and Dedicate Portion of Fee Revenue to Conservation

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Date: 
10/04/2011
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Erin Mooney, National Press Secretary: (571) 331-7970
emooney@tu.org
Trout Unlimited Calls on Gov. corbett to Tighten Marcellus Shale Environmental Standards and Dedicate Portion of Fee Revenue to Conservation
"Gov. Corbett's Marcellus Shale plan announced yesterday is a step in the right direction towards improving existing environmental standards related to Marcellus Shale development, but these measures, including the allocation of funding from an impact fee, must be greatly strengthened to adequately protect Pennsylvania's natural resources," said Katy Dunlap, Trout Unlimited's (TU) Eastern Water Project Director.
Echoing the state's Marcellus Shale Advisory Commission recommendation, Gov. Corbett called for extending the distance between a gas well and surface water from 100 feet to 300 feet. While an improvement, the 300-foot distance must be measured from the edge of the well pad - as opposed to the well bore - to provide a reasonable buffer between drilling activities and water resources. The Governor's plan did not make this distinction. Additionally, for high quality, exceptional value streams and other important trout waters, TU calls for even greater setbacks from well pads - to be determined on a site-specific basis - to assure that coldwater resources are protected from possible pollution incidents.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Enviornmental Council Focuses On Monocacy Floods

Environmental Council Focuses on Monocacy Floods

Trees and shrubs along the creek can help lower the risk of banks overflowing.
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Bethlehem’s Environmental Advisory Council sees the recent flooding along the Monocacy Creek as an opportunity.
“It’s time for intercommunity cooperation,” said Jack Abel, EAC member and former chair of the Bethlehem Planning Commission.
In the past month, the Monocacy has flooded the Colonial Industrial Quarter of the Historic Bethlehem Partnership five times, the EAC noted. And on Sept. 28, way upstream, the Monocacy overflowed and filled downtown Bath with water 2 feet deep for the first time anyone could remember.